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Force of Reason

Force of Reason

  • By John Lakveet
  • Release 17/03/2009
  • Music Genre New Age
  • Media Format CD
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Price: £15.06

Product Notes

Composed, recorded and performed by John Lakveet. Mastered by Ron Boots. Many musicians that are active in the field of retro electronic music or Berlin School produce (ultra) long tracks of music which (most of the time) of course is no problem. There are also musicians who like to tell the same story but in a shorter period of time. The Spaniard John Lakveet is such a storyteller. Try to compare this with progressive rock where bands in the eighties wanted to bring the same message as before but now without the long-stretched solos on guitars and keyboards. Together with his fellow countryman Dom F. Scab, Lakveet is a master of the short story. Also, he is a master of the sequence. He already proved this on his previous 3 albums on the Groove label. "The Force Of Reason" again opens with superb sequences in "Leibniz And Contingency". It is not all sequences on the album: on "Copleston Aperture" and the brilliant "Checkmate To B. Russell" John shows his skills in the field of ambient. In the last track he moves from ambient to a great sequence. And there is more: "Descartes, The Lance Argument" with it's driving and pumping sequences and the epic "Nihil-Buster". Yes, John creates a long track after all, one of more than 24 minutes. It opens with experimental soundscapes, than comes a kind of an eighties feeling in case of rhythm, Mellotron flutes, more soundscapes and ending with parts that could be uses as film music. This piece shows another side of John and it is a fascinating side. With "The Force Of Reason" the master of the sequence also shows he is a master of ambiences. Where would this lead him further? Press Information The Groove site describes The Force of Reason as "versatile melodic sequencing." Versatile is a perfect description of this excellent release. Yes, the classic Berlin school touches are there - great synths and sequencing and all that. But what really satisfies is the varied moods and sounds employed so effectively throughout. The centerpiece is "Nihil-ibuster", an amazing feat for the usually concise Lakveet. This epic musical concept stretches over nearly 25 minutes, unheard of for the man who, like fellow Spaniard Dom F. Scab, specializes in pop-length synth tunes. It is a daring, experimental piece for Lakveet, and he pulls it off beautifully - a piano section here, a flute section there, a smattering of atmospheric sounds and effects, and perhaps most surprising of all, no sequencing until almost 17 minutes have gone by. If you prefer his more melodic composed works, you will still have plenty to choose from. The lead-off track "Leibniz and contingency" is first and foremost about the bubbly sequencing, which starts from the word go. But even this track is a tale of two halves, the latter being sparse tinkling electronics and light lead lines amidst a backdrop of various synth textures. I never cease to be impressed by great sequencing, and the middle of "Checkmate to B. Russell" is an excellent case in point. The bright shimmering tones of "Copleston aperture" focus more on atmosphere than melody or sequencing, although an energetic rhythmic passage ensues later on. The catchiest number is "In-Kant-able", trademark Lakveet with tight sequences, infectious rhythms, and memorable melodies. Highly recommended. 2005. Phil Derby / Electroambient Space Groove Unlimited is like the "Energizer Bunny." They just keep going and going and going and going ... and releasing amazing electronica by amazing talents - well-known and newly discovered. The gems that they release are often instant Berlin school classics. John Lakveet is one of their rising stars and while it is not yet a classic, Force of Reason is an outstanding CD. (John is also a veteran performer. He has released eight CD's, four of which are on the Groove label.) John's sound design incorporates many influences, among which the Berlin school is dominant. This disc is definitely in that school but it is not retro. John augments his sequences with symphonic synths and brilliant melodies. That technique creates it's own atmospheres and the recording techniques enhance them. John's versatility takes center stage as he segues between the Berlin school, ambient and even minimalism. This CD is very deep and appeals on many levels. It has a little bit of everything for all fans of electronic music. 2005. Jim Brenholts John Lakveet develops daring, imaginative ideas in this CD, preferably aimed at Space Sequencer Music. Lakveet is no doubt one of the most sophisticated flagmen of the electronic music currently being created. In this CD we find eight compositions full of emotions and electronic adventures. The whole album has a strong cosmic air, not only due to the use of synthesizers, but also because of the style of the compositions itself. There also are elements of Synth-Pop and Ambient. Several compositions have moments of a greater introspection, perhaps near to meditation, together with other instants of a simple, straightforward experimentation, yet always keeping to the most melodic aspects of the artist. Some passages are cold, mysterious. Others turn out to be warm, emotional. An album that no doubt deserves an attentive listening. Edgar Kogler Many musicians that are active in the retro Electronic Music/Berlin School produce (ultra) long tracks of music, which (most of the time) are nice to listen to. There are also musicians who like to tell the same story, but in shorter segments. The Spaniard John Lakveet is such a teller of short stories. Try to compare his approach with progressive rock, in which bands in the 1980s wanted to bring the same message as before, but now without the long solos on guitars and keyboards. Together with his fellow countryman, Dom F. Scab, Lakveet is a master of the short story. Also, he is a master of the sequencer. Already he proved this on his previous 3 albums, which are on the Groove label. "The Force Of Reason" opens with superb sequences in "Leibniz And Contingency". It is not just sequences on the album, however. On "Copleston Aperture" and the brilliant "Descartes, The Lance Argument" John shows his skills in ambient music. In the last track he moves from ambient to a great sequence. And there is more. "Nihil-iBuster" contains driving and pumping sequences as well as epic "Platon In The Cave Of Mirrors". However, yes, John creates a long 24-minute track after all. It opens with experimental soundscapes, and then within it emerges a type of rhythm with a 1980s feeling, Mellotron flutes, more soundscapes, and an ending that could be used as film music. This piece shows another side of John and it is a fascinating one. With "The Force Of Reason", the master of the sequencer also shows that he is a master of ambience. Paul Rijkens / Sonic Immersion.

Details

Artist: John Lakveet
Title: Force of Reason
Genre: New Age
Release Date: 17/03/2009
Label: CD Baby
Media Format: CD
UPC: 8715164001177

Credits